Fostering awareness of self in the education of social work students by means of critical reflectivity

Sandra Berna Ferreira, Regardt Jacobus Ferreira

Abstract


Fostering awareness of self in the education of social work students has focused primarily on a micro-conceptualisation of the self, which implies that the attention was, and still is, mainly on the intrapsychic processes brought about by theory and field practicum. The main argument is that the self should also encompass a macro-conceptualisation, where students have to ask themselves how they contribute to the maintenance of societal structures and how these structures influence them in the forming of their assumptions and belief systems about the self and the world. Three categories of critical-reflectivity questions asked about a parable on death and dying in a class discussion can sensitise students about the self as a product and a co-creator of society in the grieving process. These questions furthermore resonate an African-centred world view in the understanding of the self.


Keywords


self, self-awareness, critical reflectivity, macro-conceptualisation, social work education, death and dying, African-centred world view

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References


References

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.15270/55-2-679

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