THE INFLUENCE OF FAMILY DYNAMICS ON THE PRODUCTIVITY OF WORKING MOTHERS IN A MOTOR COMPANY IN SOUTH AFRICA

  • Liesl Riekert Department of Social Work and Criminology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
  • Florinda Taute Department of Social Work and Criminology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa

Abstract

Since the inception of a non-racial, non-sexist democracy in South Africa in 1994, it is notsurprising to find many mothers have entered various professional fields and occupations. “Theinflux of women into the workforce, the economic necessity of two-income families, theincrease in single-parent families, child care and elder care availability and affordability, andincreased time pressure have all contributed to work and family concerns” (Gebeke, 1993:1).Unfortunately many families and businesses have neglected to adapt to these changes. Thewomen-in-business debate, however, has changed because so much has changed socially overthe last 15 years (Bendeman, 2007). The increased pressure that employers place on employeesto meet the needs of their customers and run a profitable business needs to be addressed, asemployers, according to Blanchard (2000), need to put effective structures and systems in placefor people to want to perform.

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Published
2014-06-18
Section
Articles