PSYCHOSOCIAL DEFICITS ASSOCIATED WITH TEENAGERS BORN AND RAISED IN A “SMALL-HOUSE” FAMILY SETTING IN CHERUTOMBO IN MARONDERA, ZIMBABWE

Keywords: Socialization, Social stigma, cultural taboo, moral bankruptcy, clandestine relationships, concubine/mistresses, emotional turbulence

Abstract

The family as a sacrosanct conduit of care and protection, as well as a forum for the socialisation of children is increasingly being threatened in Zimbabwe by the exponentially growing impact of the small-house phenomenon (clandestine extramarital affairs). This article reports on a qualitative study, which established that being born and raised in a small-house family is associated with feelings of rejection, loneliness, loss of identity, low self-esteem, poor social intelligence and social stigma. These psychosocial deficits have been noted to contribute to developmental and emotional challenges for children, which can have undesirable social outcomes. This discussion is intended to support service providers and families to effectively safeguard the wellbeing of these children.

Author Biographies

Shingirai Paul Mbulayi, University of Fort Hare
Department of Social Development
Simon Kang’ethe, University of Fort Hare
Department of Social Development
Published
2020-03-24
How to Cite
Mbulayi, S. P., & Kang’ethe, S. (2020). PSYCHOSOCIAL DEFICITS ASSOCIATED WITH TEENAGERS BORN AND RAISED IN A “SMALL-HOUSE” FAMILY SETTING IN CHERUTOMBO IN MARONDERA, ZIMBABWE. Social Work/Maatskaplike Werk, 56(1), 97-108. https://doi.org/10.15270/56-1-793
Section
Articles